Lucky

Apr 18

(Source: aerbor, via dearmarielouise)

sociolab:

anintersubjectiveworld:

Fact: You can’t teach sociology without making people uncomfortable. The entire venture is designed to make people question the ideas they’re taught in everyday life, about supposedly “natural” behavior, supposedly “normal” social organization, supposedly “self-evident” truth. Sociology consists of yanking those out, sometimes quite forcefully. It also consists of teaching people that their emotions are social creatures, learned, normalized, adjusted for the demands of social organization, not internal reactions. It consists of making them realize that their opinions are not their own. If they could opt out of whatever upsets them, we can just abandon all efforts.

There are few things that make me as livid as statements like this.  People who write about trigger warnings in this way obviously have no idea what a trigger is or how triggering topics can affect someone.
Yes, sociology makes people uncomfortable because it challenges so many taken for granted beliefs.  But that’s not what trigger warnings are about.  It is about warning students when there will be discussion of sensitive topics that a person may or may not have experienced first hand.  Trigger warnings for racism are not for white people.  Trigger warnings for slurs are not for the privileged groups that use them as weapons.  Trigger warnings for sexual assault/rape are not for rapists.
I think it is perfectly appropriate to warn students before discussions about sexual assault, violence, suicide, or whatever other topics may be of a sensitive nature.  I would never ever want any of my students to be forced into a situation, where there is already an unequal power dynamic, that may negatively affect their well-being.
My friend sat through a presentation of a graphic poem about a woman’s experience with sexual assault in one of her classes.  The poem and the following discussion re-traumatized her and the students’ responses made her feel unsafe.  I sat with her afterwards while she told me what happened.  I would never ever want one of my students to leave class like that.  What kind of educational purpose does that serve?  She doesn’t need to learn about a woman’s experience with sexual assault.  She knows.

sociolab:

anintersubjectiveworld:

Fact: You can’t teach sociology without making people uncomfortable. The entire venture is designed to make people question the ideas they’re taught in everyday life, about supposedly “natural” behavior, supposedly “normal” social organization, supposedly “self-evident” truth. Sociology consists of yanking those out, sometimes quite forcefully. It also consists of teaching people that their emotions are social creatures, learned, normalized, adjusted for the demands of social organization, not internal reactions. It consists of making them realize that their opinions are not their own. If they could opt out of whatever upsets them, we can just abandon all efforts.

There are few things that make me as livid as statements like this.  People who write about trigger warnings in this way obviously have no idea what a trigger is or how triggering topics can affect someone.

Yes, sociology makes people uncomfortable because it challenges so many taken for granted beliefs.  But that’s not what trigger warnings are about.  It is about warning students when there will be discussion of sensitive topics that a person may or may not have experienced first hand.  Trigger warnings for racism are not for white people.  Trigger warnings for slurs are not for the privileged groups that use them as weapons.  Trigger warnings for sexual assault/rape are not for rapists.

I think it is perfectly appropriate to warn students before discussions about sexual assault, violence, suicide, or whatever other topics may be of a sensitive nature.  I would never ever want any of my students to be forced into a situation, where there is already an unequal power dynamic, that may negatively affect their well-being.

My friend sat through a presentation of a graphic poem about a woman’s experience with sexual assault in one of her classes.  The poem and the following discussion re-traumatized her and the students’ responses made her feel unsafe.  I sat with her afterwards while she told me what happened.  I would never ever want one of my students to leave class like that.  What kind of educational purpose does that serve?  She doesn’t need to learn about a woman’s experience with sexual assault.  She knows.

Apr 17

(via sinisterexaggerator)

ambivalentlyyours:

“The point is not for women simply to take power out of men’s hands, since that wouldn’t change anything about the world. It’s a question precisely of destroying that notion of power.” 
― Simone de Beauvoir

ambivalentlyyours:

“The point is not for women simply to take power out of men’s hands, since that wouldn’t change anything about the world. It’s a question precisely of destroying that notion of power.” 

― Simone de Beauvoir

(via feministsociology)

mpdrolet:

From Meet Me On The Surface
Louis Heilbronn

mpdrolet:

From Meet Me On The Surface

Louis Heilbronn

cadenced:

Gary Perkins photograph from Stage 6 of the 2009 Absa Cape Epic.

cadenced:

Gary Perkins photograph from Stage 6 of the 2009 Absa Cape Epic.

[video]

untrustyou:

Leche de Mipalo 

untrustyou:

Leche de Mipalo 

(via super-moss)

[video]

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia


Maybe one day I shall check him out

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia

Maybe one day I shall check him out

(via npr)